Tag Archives: Confessions of a Thug

What would you gamble for a better life?

Many people of the British Empire were ready to risk anything for a better future. People emigrating to India endured a three-month voyage on ships that were tossed about like corks. Then, they had to cope with conditions so foreign … Continue reading

Posted in British Raj, Charles Dickens, Downton Abbey, the bibighar, the Indian Mutiny, The Lucknow Courtesans: Indian Queens of a Golden Age, The Memorial Well, The Music of Lucknow After the 1857 Rebellion, The Music of Lucknow after the 1857 Rebellion, The princely states of India | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

A hero, novelist and an Englishman who was beloved by the Indian people whose lives he improved

Few people today know the name, Philip Meadows Taylor. He came out to India when he was barely fifteen. Like many who came to the subcontinent, he had few resources in England. He did not attend Haileybury, the training school … Continue reading

Posted in 19th century India, A hero, novelist and an Englishman who was beloved by the Indian people whose lives he improved, A hero, novelist and an Englishman who was beloved by the Indian people whose lives he improved, Nizam of Hyderabad, The princely states of India | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Crime in Victorian India: the Incredible Cult of Murder and the Drug Trade

Cult members of thuggee For three hundred years, the subcontinent harboured one of the most incredible religions conceived by the mind of man: Thuggee, the cult that gave it’s members a divine duty to commit murder. The mythological story of … Continue reading

Posted in 19th century India, victorian India | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment