Tag Archives: Victorian murders

“THE NAPOLEON OF CRIME”

Adam Worth, sometimes given the same epithet as the fictional villian who challenged Sherlock Holmes, “The Napoleon of Crime”, was a German-born criminal mastermind. Worth was born in Germany in 1844, the first child of a poor Jewish family; his … Continue reading

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Murder Mysteries

Do you know who Svengali was, or Count Fosco, or Lydia Gwilt? All were famous villians of nineteenth century murder mysteries. All three raised issues about the society of the time 1860s  to 1890s. After the discovery of “mesmerism” in … Continue reading

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The most difficult type of murder to solve in Victorian times

Without access to modern forensic science, Victorian crime fighters were often stuck when it came to murder by poison. A good example of this kind of crime were the proven murders committed by Stanislaws Kosloski, a.k.a John Chapman, one of … Continue reading

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The health risks of street lighting during the Victorian age

In order to light the streets of the Metropolis (when Sherlock Holmes was written, the word Metropolis was capitalized and only applied to London) the flames of the street lamps had to be produced with a stable gas not likely … Continue reading

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Could the real Sherlock Holmes have stopped Jack the Ripper?

Many people do not realize that Sherlock Holmes was based on a real person: Dr. Joseph Bell, one of the world’s first forensic pathologists. In more than one case Bell’s careful forensic method led to hanging a murderer who would … Continue reading

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Has Sherlock Holmes become an action hero instead of a deep thinker?

I have just watched two of the trailers for “A game of shadows,” the soon-to-be-released film, written by Anthony Horowitz, writer/producer for various BBC mystery shows. After watching the frenetic activities of Holmes and Watson, I ask myself, Has Holmes … Continue reading

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Ghosts, speakers of the dead from the past in crime

SOMETIMES THE DEAD REALLY CAN TALK The connection between crime and the supernatural in nineteenth century England often had to do with the gulf between the dangerous classes and the newly emerging middle class. Jack the Ripper was as much … Continue reading

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